Daniellelovee
  • Daniellelovee
What is gravitation? the effect of air pressure in pushing objects to the ground<< the tendency of objects to move downward the attraction of any two objects because of their mass the attraction or repulsion of objects because of their electric charge
Physics
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SOLVED
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schrodinger
  • schrodinger
I got my questions answered at brainly.com in under 10 minutes. Go to brainly.com now for free help!
Daniellelovee
  • Daniellelovee
The force of gravity between any two ordinary objects on the earth is __________. always downward stronger when closer to the earth<< stronger if the objects are more massive stronger than the force of gravity from the earth
Daniellelovee
  • Daniellelovee
What is Kepler's first law of planetary motion? The period of a planet's orbit is proportional to its distance from the sun. The eccentricity of a planet's orbit is proportional to its distance from the sun. Planets have circular orbits. Planets have elliptical orbits.<<
Daniellelovee
  • Daniellelovee
I put the << symbols next to the choice I thought was the correct one

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Brrandyn
  • Brrandyn
Do try to limit one question per post, that is if you have any interest of its understanding. Relating to gravitation, evaluate the multiple choice. A) Is air pressure necessary for gravity to affect an object (on Earth)? B) Does an object's inertia describe why it has this tendency? C) Is attraction relevant? D) Is attraction of repulsion relevant and especially because of electric charge?
Daniellelovee
  • Daniellelovee
im between A and C because it is about mass but air pressure I think also plays an important role
Daniellelovee
  • Daniellelovee
yes
Daniellelovee
  • Daniellelovee
The first was the effort to understand the motion of objects on the earth
Daniellelovee
  • Daniellelovee
The other effort, to understand the motions of the planets
Daniellelovee
  • Daniellelovee
wait now that I think of it Im 97% sure that choice C is the correct one
Brrandyn
  • Brrandyn
All of Newton's 2 Laws of Motion relate to motion of objects on Earth. The 2nd is still applicable, too. So really, your understanding is wrong. Recall that Newton's 1st Law of Motion states that an object's motion remains in motion or at rest unless acted upon a net external force. Well, in theory, air pressure can be considered a non-conservative force, and therefore, if it's negligible, really, choice A is wrong.
Daniellelovee
  • Daniellelovee
Newton stated that every two objects in the universe attract each other with a force along the line between them.
Daniellelovee
  • Daniellelovee
@Brrandyn
Brrandyn
  • Brrandyn
Well, okay, that's surely applicable to Newton's Universal Law of Gravitation. Now I understand what you are referring to. Gravitational force between two bodies is \[\alpha ProductOfMass\] (+ more logistics) So yes, C is correct. Sorry, I've been struggling with trying to draw a diagram, the borders follow my cursor, quite infuriating.
Brrandyn
  • Brrandyn
Do you understand why B and D are incorrect?
Daniellelovee
  • Daniellelovee
yes but my two initial choices were A and C
Brrandyn
  • Brrandyn
If atmospheric pressure is gone, theoretically, would it still describe gravitation?
Daniellelovee
  • Daniellelovee
yes
Brrandyn
  • Brrandyn
Your response should be "no" because it's no longer apposite. For B, remember that objects have a tendency to resist change of their current state. Thus, tendency to fall isn't logical. D should be omitted easily.
Daniellelovee
  • Daniellelovee
so then like I said before "wait now that I think of it Im 97% sure that choice C is the correct one"
Brrandyn
  • Brrandyn
Yes, I've already given you clarity. However, evaluate your understanding of A.
Daniellelovee
  • Daniellelovee
alright thank you very much and are my other two choices for the next questions correct? @Brrandyn
Brrandyn
  • Brrandyn
The gravity of Earth remains constant regardless of its position. If that wasn't the case, well.... (omit excess here). No, your response to the second question is incorrect. Recall that the force of gravity of an object is its Mass∗9.8 Where the "9.8" is measured in m/s/s & is Earth's gravity.
Brrandyn
  • Brrandyn
--and for the last question, you're correct.
Daniellelovee
  • Daniellelovee
so the second question would be D?
Daniellelovee
  • Daniellelovee
@Brrandyn

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