anonymous
  • anonymous
Joe applies a force of 20 N for 1/20 sec. to a soccer ball. What is its change in momentum? If the soccer ball's mass is 0.5 kg, how fast is it going after he kicks it? Thank you and I appreciate the help!
Physics
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SOLVED
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katieb
  • katieb
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anonymous
  • anonymous
@shamim @satellite73 @SolomonZelman @dan815 @TheSmartOne @zepdrix @Loser66 @Luigi0210 @robtobey @AlexandervonHumboldt2 @uri @Mehek14 @sleepyjess @ikram002p @Miracrown
anonymous
  • anonymous
@Hero@dan815 @TheSmartOne @Pooja195@Luigi0210 @AlexandervonHumboldt2 @triciaal@johnweldon1993 @satellite73 @zepdrix
anonymous
  • anonymous
@amistre64 @Astrophysics @dan815 @satellite73 @zepdrix

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anonymous
  • anonymous
@TheSmartOne @Luigi0210 @AlexandervonHumboldt2 @Compassionate @mathmale @mathmate @jhonyy9 @sleepyjess @Miracrown @ShadowLegendX @UsukiDoll @just_one_last_goodbye @Astrophysics
anonymous
  • anonymous
@dan815 @TheSmartOne @Luigi0210 @AlexandervonHumboldt2 @Compassionate @sleepyjess @satellite73 @amistre64 @SolomonZelman
anonymous
  • anonymous
@SolomonZelman @amistre64
anonymous
  • anonymous
@TheSmartOne @Loser66 @Luigi0210 @robtobey @AlexandervonHumboldt2
TheSmartOne
  • TheSmartOne
You have tagged me 5 times on this one post. -.-
anonymous
  • anonymous
I'm sorry ;_;
TheSmartOne
  • TheSmartOne
@Michele_Laino
anonymous
  • anonymous
For both of these you need to use the principle that impulse is the change in momentum. 1. change in momentum = Impulse = force * impact time 2. change in momentum = mass * (final velocity - initial velocity)
anonymous
  • anonymous
@peachpi But couldn't the Impulse-momentum theorem be used? \[F \Delta t = P(final) - P(initial)\]
anonymous
  • anonymous
yes, this is all using the impulse momentum theorem.
anonymous
  • anonymous
So would the change in momentum be 1 N * sec?
anonymous
  • anonymous
yes
anonymous
  • anonymous
awesome! is there a way to figure out how fast it goes afterwards?
anonymous
  • anonymous
Yes, you'd use impulse momentum again. \[F \Delta t=m \Delta v\] If you make the assumption that the ball was initially at rest, then solving for \(\Delta v\) gives your final velocity
anonymous
  • anonymous
oh, so would the answer be 2 (N* sec)/kg ?
anonymous
  • anonymous
2 m/s once you do a little work on the units
anonymous
  • anonymous
oh yea, I see what you mean about the units. Thanks for the help, I really appreciate it! You don't mind if I ask you a few more questions on this thread?
anonymous
  • anonymous
no I don't mind
anonymous
  • anonymous
A man (mass man = 50 kg) rushes at 6 m/s to save a 20 kg child standing in front of a moving car. He pushes the child at 7 m/s. What is the man's final velocity after the push? What is his velocity if he grabs the child instead?
anonymous
  • anonymous
I'm a bit confused on what equation to use.
anonymous
  • anonymous
I'm thinking these are collisions Initial momentum = man's mass * man's initial velocity Final momentum (push) = man's mass * man's final velocity + child's mass * child's final velocity Final momentum (carry) = (man's mass + child's mass) * (combined final velocity) For both situations, momentum is conserved. (initial P = final P) Push: (50 kg)(6 m/s) = (50 kg)\(v_f\) + (20 kg)(7 m/s) Carry (50 kg)(6 m/s) = (50 kg + 20 kg)\(v_f\)
anonymous
  • anonymous
Oh I see, thank you! I think I switched what equations I used for each situation when I attempted it earlier today. I have another question that I've been struggling with: 8 kids on a "merry go round" are the the outer edge and move to the center. If the original angular velocity was 2 rad/sec and the moment of inertia went from 50 kg * m^2 to 40 kg * m^2, what is the new angular velocity?
Michele_Laino
  • Michele_Laino
hint: if we can neglect the friction forces, then we can apply the conservation of angular momentum, namely we can apply this formula: \[{I_1}{\omega _1} = {I_2}{\omega _2}\] where \(I\) is the momentum of inertia, with respect to the rotation axis. Furthermore, we can write: \[I = \sum\limits_i {{m_i}r_i^2} \] and the index \(i\) runs on all the particles which compose the physical system

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