anonymous
  • anonymous
What is true about the theory of plate tectonics and the theory of continental drift?
Earth Sciences
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katieb
  • katieb
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anonymous
  • anonymous
Will medal and fan. @pooja195 @TheSmartOne @Azbadar
pooja195
  • pooja195
Are there options ?
anonymous
  • anonymous
No

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anonymous
  • anonymous
@pooja195
pooja195
  • pooja195
Share on printShare on emailShare on twitterShare on facebook| More Sharing Services Share| Cite World > Geography > World Geography Continental Drift and Plate-Tectonics Theory Source: U.S. Dept. of the Interior, Geological Survey According to the theory of continental drift, the world was made up of a single continent through most of geologic time. That continent eventually separated and drifted apart, forming into the seven continents we have today. The first comprehensive theory of continental drift was suggested by the German meteorologist Alfred Wegener in 1912. The hypothesis asserts that the continents consist of lighter rocks that rest on heavier crustal material—similar to the manner in which icebergs float on water. Wegener contended that the relative positions of the continents are not rigidly fixed but are slowly moving—at a rate of about one yard per century. According to the generally accepted plate-tectonics theory, scientists believe that Earth's surface is broken into a number of shifting slabs or plates, which average about 50 miles in thickness. These plates move relative to one another above a hotter, deeper, more mobile zone at average rates as great as a few inches per year. Most of the world's active volcanoes are located along or near the boundaries between shifting plates and are called plate-boundary volcanoes. The peripheral areas of the Pacific Ocean Basin, containing the boundaries of several plates, are dotted with many active volcanoes that form the so-called Ring of Fire. The Ring provides excellent examples of plate-boundary volcanoes, including Mount St. Helens. However, some active volcanoes are not associated with plate boundaries, and many of these so-called intra-plate volcanoes form roughly linear chains in the interior of some oceanic plates. The Hawaiian Islands provide perhaps the best example of an intra-plate volcanic chain, developed by the northwest-moving Pacific plate passing over an inferred “hot spot” that initiates the magma-generation and volcano-formation process. Plate-Tectonics Theory—The Lithosphere Plates of Earth
pooja195
  • pooja195
http://www.infoplease.com/ipa/A0001765.html
anonymous
  • anonymous
So therefore the theory of plate tectonics explains how continental movements could occur?
pooja195
  • pooja195
Yes
anonymous
  • anonymous
Okay thanks.

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