anonymous
  • anonymous
punnett squares help?
Biology
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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jamiebookeater
  • jamiebookeater
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DangerousJesse
  • DangerousJesse
What is it that you don't understand?
anonymous
  • anonymous
DangerousJesse
  • DangerousJesse
Each square is 25%. The parents are both heterozygous, which means they carry, but don't show, recessive traits. How many of their children are heterozygous as well?

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DangerousJesse
  • DangerousJesse
Oops, scratch that. They're asking about phenotypes. How many homozygous dominant and heterozygous offspring are there?
anonymous
  • anonymous
I am bad at punnett squares... and learning them
DangerousJesse
  • DangerousJesse
That's fine!
DangerousJesse
  • DangerousJesse
I love explaining them. The dominant trait is the big R, while the recessive trait is the little r. Whenever you have a heterozygous parent, you have a big R and a little r, Rr.
anonymous
  • anonymous
so then wouldnt the answer be 50%?
DangerousJesse
  • DangerousJesse
A heterozygous parent will carry the recessive trait and show the dominant trait, since big R almost always beats little r.
DangerousJesse
  • DangerousJesse
No, you're looking at the genotype. They're asking about the phenotype, how the offspring will look.
DangerousJesse
  • DangerousJesse
Let's say the big R is a red flower and the little r is a white flower. We won't go into incomplete dominance, since that's probably later in the unit. When the parent is RR, they are red; when a parent is Rr, they are red; and when a parent is rr, they are white.
DangerousJesse
  • DangerousJesse
Both parents are Rr, so their offspring include one RR, two Rr, and one rr. Based on what I just told you, how many of those offspring will be red?
anonymous
  • anonymous
3?
DangerousJesse
  • DangerousJesse
Yep, and what percent is 3/4?
anonymous
  • anonymous
so then 75%?
DangerousJesse
  • DangerousJesse
Yep :)
anonymous
  • anonymous
Thank you so much. Could you help me some more?
DangerousJesse
  • DangerousJesse
Sure, I love genetics.
anonymous
  • anonymous
anonymous
  • anonymous
would this be 25%?
DangerousJesse
  • DangerousJesse
Yep :) Nice job
anonymous
  • anonymous
DangerousJesse
  • DangerousJesse
Do you know how to set up a Punnet square?
anonymous
  • anonymous
kind of
DangerousJesse
  • DangerousJesse
|dw:1450205701395:dw|
DangerousJesse
  • DangerousJesse
|dw:1450205825264:dw|
DangerousJesse
  • DangerousJesse
You'll combine the two traits linked together in each box, like so:|dw:1450205980428:dw|
DangerousJesse
  • DangerousJesse
I'm sorry if the drawing is confusing, I can't use differently colored pens ;-;
DangerousJesse
  • DangerousJesse
But you can see from it that there is one PP, two Pp, and one pp.
anonymous
  • anonymous
so im guessing the answer is D?
DangerousJesse
  • DangerousJesse
Yep, can you see why?
DangerousJesse
  • DangerousJesse
Okay. When you're writing a Punnet square, you put one one the parent's genotypes (Rr in this case) on top, and the other parent's genotype (also Rr) on the left side.
DangerousJesse
  • DangerousJesse
When you're going through each of the squares to write the offspring's genotype, you'll see whether there's a recessive or dominant trait above, then you'll look to see whether there's a dominant or recessive trait to the left.
DangerousJesse
  • DangerousJesse
You completely ignore the other offspring's squares, only looking at the parents' genotypes. If you see one dominant trait (big R) above and one recessive trait (little r) to the left, you'll write Rr in that square. If you see the little r above and the big R to the left, you'll write the same thing.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Oh okay I get it I think lol
DangerousJesse
  • DangerousJesse
Awesome :) Let me know if you have any more trouble
anonymous
  • anonymous
I have 2 more questions I think on the same subject I need help with. I have them answered I just don't know if they are correct or not
DangerousJesse
  • DangerousJesse
Cool, shoot 'em.
anonymous
  • anonymous
anonymous
  • anonymous
anonymous
  • anonymous
^ that one I think is B
DangerousJesse
  • DangerousJesse
You got that one right with A, the Law of Dominance is Mendel's third law, and it basically says that any genotype that isn't homozygous recessive (tt) will show the dominant trait.
anonymous
  • anonymous
okay
anonymous
  • anonymous
is my answer correct for the other one too?

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