anonymous
  • anonymous
Putting stuff in order help?
Biology
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
Hey! We 've verified this expert answer for you, click below to unlock the details :)
SOLVED
At vero eos et accusamus et iusto odio dignissimos ducimus qui blanditiis praesentium voluptatum deleniti atque corrupti quos dolores et quas molestias excepturi sint occaecati cupiditate non provident, similique sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollitia animi, id est laborum et dolorum fuga. Et harum quidem rerum facilis est et expedita distinctio. Nam libero tempore, cum soluta nobis est eligendi optio cumque nihil impedit quo minus id quod maxime placeat facere possimus, omnis voluptas assumenda est, omnis dolor repellendus. Itaque earum rerum hic tenetur a sapiente delectus, ut aut reiciendis voluptatibus maiores alias consequatur aut perferendis doloribus asperiores repellat.
katieb
  • katieb
I got my questions answered at brainly.com in under 10 minutes. Go to brainly.com now for free help!
anonymous
  • anonymous
DangerousJesse
  • DangerousJesse
Okay, so DNA>RNA>Protein 1)DNA's double helix unzips and is used by mRNA (messenger RNA) as a template 2)mRNA travels through the cytoplasm of the cell to ribosome 3)mRNA is read by the ribosome three nucleotides (1 codone) at a time 4)as the ribosome reads, tRNA (transport RNA) whose anticodone compliments the mRNA's codone comes along with an amino acid and attaches itself to the mRNA 5)the ribosome reads another codone and the tRNA with the proper anticodone attaches itself, only this time the amino acids attached to the tRNA form polypeptide bonds 6) the ribosome reads through yet another codone and the tRNA with the proper anticodone and amino acid connects yet again, and the amino acid forms another polypeptide bond with the previous amino acid, only this time the first tRNA is knocked off, leaving only the tRNA's amino acid connected to the previous amino acid. This continues until the ribosome reads a stop codone. When it reads that, you have a string of polypeptide-bonded amino acids and no tRNA attached to them. A chaperone protein will then come along and assist that string by folding it up into a protein molecule. Then the mRNA goes back and the cycle starts again.
DangerousJesse
  • DangerousJesse
Transcription begins when the mRNA copies the DNA. Translation begins when the protein is made using the mRNA.

Looking for something else?

Not the answer you are looking for? Search for more explanations.

More answers

DangerousJesse
  • DangerousJesse
So it's DNA unzips Transcription mRNA moves translation Protein assembles
DangerousJesse
  • DangerousJesse
It took me sooooo long to memorize that, so it's fine if it doesn't make complete sense at the moment.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Thank you! and lol. Can you help me with something else too? Just to check and see if my answer is correct?
DangerousJesse
  • DangerousJesse
Sure
anonymous
  • anonymous
DangerousJesse
  • DangerousJesse
All of those look right apart from the last one under DNA. DNA never leaves the nucleus, ever.
DangerousJesse
  • DangerousJesse
So move that to RNA
anonymous
  • anonymous
Thank you! If its not too much to ask I have a couple more questions I need help with. Again, I have them answered I just need them checked.
DangerousJesse
  • DangerousJesse
That's fine :)
anonymous
  • anonymous
Someone said this is C but I thought it was D
DangerousJesse
  • DangerousJesse
I believe D is correct, as prokaryotes do not have a nucleus
anonymous
  • anonymous
DangerousJesse
  • DangerousJesse
Karen is the only one whose fingerprints match those belonging to the birdbath
anonymous
  • anonymous
anonymous
  • anonymous
I thought it was B but then someone said C
DangerousJesse
  • DangerousJesse
It's C. If you can regulate the differentiation of cells in mammals, you can make it so that they develop more stem cells. Stem cells can be used for organ transplants.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Ohh okay. Thank you so much!!:)

Looking for something else?

Not the answer you are looking for? Search for more explanations.