PhaserDazeHer
  • PhaserDazeHer
Read this excerpt from act III, scene II, of Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet: NURSE: There's no trust, No faith, no honesty in men; all perjured, All forsworn, all naught, all dissemblers. Ah, where's my man? give me some aqua vitae: These griefs, these woes, these sorrows make me old. Shame come to Romeo! JULIET: Blister'd be thy tongue For such a wish! he was not born to shame: Upon his brow shame is ashamed to sit; For 'tis a throne where honour may be crown'd Sole monarch of the universal earth. O, what a beast was I to chide at him!
English
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SOLVED
At vero eos et accusamus et iusto odio dignissimos ducimus qui blanditiis praesentium voluptatum deleniti atque corrupti quos dolores et quas molestias excepturi sint occaecati cupiditate non provident, similique sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollitia animi, id est laborum et dolorum fuga. Et harum quidem rerum facilis est et expedita distinctio. Nam libero tempore, cum soluta nobis est eligendi optio cumque nihil impedit quo minus id quod maxime placeat facere possimus, omnis voluptas assumenda est, omnis dolor repellendus. Itaque earum rerum hic tenetur a sapiente delectus, ut aut reiciendis voluptatibus maiores alias consequatur aut perferendis doloribus asperiores repellat.
jamiebookeater
  • jamiebookeater
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iGreenHacked
  • iGreenHacked
Whats the question?
PhaserDazeHer
  • PhaserDazeHer
Amy is writing a literary analysis essay about how the dialogue in Romeo and Juliet reveals the personalities of the characters. Which sentence best explains Shakespeare's choice of language in Juliet's lines? It shows how calmly Juliet accepts the news of Romeo’s disappearance. It shows how Juliet puts on a brave face upon hearing about Romeo's banishment. It shows how Juliet is forcefully determined to defend her husband's honor. It shows how Juliet curses the nurse for shaming Romeo. It shows how Juliet possesses a wide range of emotions.
PhaserDazeHer
  • PhaserDazeHer
Sorry open study is being slow for me today.

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PhaserDazeHer
  • PhaserDazeHer
@iGreenHacked
anonymous
  • anonymous
i personally thinks it shows her wide range of emotions but some other would think other wise
iGreenHacked
  • iGreenHacked
I think It shows how Juliet is forcefully determined to defend her husband's honor because of her line "For such a wish! he was not born to shame" To me He was not born to shame seems like she's more defending him then anything else
anonymous
  • anonymous
Also true and i misread what he typed i was taking the whole story into consideration ;-;
PhaserDazeHer
  • PhaserDazeHer
You're the best
iGreenHacked
  • iGreenHacked
I also believe this because she says O, what a beast was I to chide at him! which means to scold or rebuke.
bunnielover948
  • bunnielover948
I believe it's 'It shows how Juliet curses the nurse for shaming Romeo.' because the last line of the nurse and the first line of Juliet
anonymous
  • anonymous
it could be she is cursing the nurse also
iGreenHacked
  • iGreenHacked
is there more then one answer because it could be both because It shows how Juliet is forcefully determined to defend her husband's honor. after the nurse says this and then in a defensive way curses the nurse
bunnielover948
  • bunnielover948
So it could be the last one, because she's doing different things while feeling different emotions all at the same time?
anonymous
  • anonymous
That's what i was thinking now that i read it over
bunnielover948
  • bunnielover948
Shakespeare makes things way too complicated while making you think and change your idea of everything

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