anonymous
  • anonymous
For a specific type of machine part being produced, the diameter is normally distributed, with a mean of 15.000 cm and a standard deviation of 0.030 cm. Machine parts with a diameter more than 2 standard deviations away from the mean are rejected. If 15,000 machine parts are manufactured, how many of these will be rejected? A) 560 B) 680 C) 750 D) 970
Mathematics
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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SOLVED
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chestercat
  • chestercat
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anonymous
  • anonymous
@mathmale
anonymous
  • anonymous
@mathmale
mathmale
  • mathmale
While I need to leave my computer soon, I'll help you set up the solution to this problem. You are dealing with SAMPLING here. You are told that the POPULATION mean is 15.000 cm, and that the population is normally distributed. The population s. d. is 0.030 cm. Then we learn we must take a SAMPLE of 15,000.

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More answers

mathmale
  • mathmale
Because the population is normally distributed, the sample mean will also be normallly distributed, at least approximately. The sample mean will be the same as the pop. mean, or 15.000 cm. However, the sample standard deviation will be smaller. Do you know how to calculate the sample s. d.?
mathmale
  • mathmale
there's a formula for that.
mathmale
  • mathmale
Do you know it, or could you look it up?
mathmale
  • mathmale
Sorry, but I have to get off the 'Net. It's been 12 minutes since I last heard from you. Perhaps we could continue with this problem later, or perhaps someone else could help you finish the work we've started. Good luck.
anonymous
  • anonymous
hey sorry i was busy can you help me im in 11th grade and im trying to pass this semsester @mathmale
anonymous
  • anonymous
@triciaal can u or somone help me im stressing here
anonymous
  • anonymous
please help
anonymous
  • anonymous
@retirEEd
anonymous
  • anonymous
can u help me @Directrix
triciaal
  • triciaal
@whpalmer4
triciaal
  • triciaal
sorry I am not the best stats person and I don't have time to figure it out need to leave
whpalmer4
  • whpalmer4
I think worrying about sample standard deviations vs. population standard deviations is not the point of the problem. Rather, the idea is that we want to find out how many normally distributed parts out of a collection of 15,000 will be more than 2 standard deviations away from the spec. The rule of thumb is that for a normal distribution going 1 standard deviation in each direction gets 68% of the population, and 2 standard deviations in each direction gets 95% of the population. (For completeness, 3 standard deviations gets 99.7%). Therefore, of a run of 15,000 parts with normal distribution, we can expect that 95% of them will be within 2 standard deviations of 15.000 cm. The other 5% do not pass.
whpalmer4
  • whpalmer4
Have a look at this page for more details: https://www.mathsisfun.com/data/standard-normal-distribution.html
anonymous
  • anonymous
can u just help what the answer is cause i have until tomorrow fir thus quiz to be due
hakunamatata34
  • hakunamatata34
wow this is a crazy question I can help go to algebra calculator on math pa
anonymous
  • anonymous
can u get somone to give me the darn answer im tired of looking at this one
anonymous
  • anonymous
@hakunamatata34
anonymous
  • anonymous
@Abhisar can u help me or just give me the answer this is stressful :(
anonymous
  • anonymous
@jfernandes can u help me or just give me the answer this is stressful :(
anonymous
  • anonymous
@Hero could u help me
hakunamatata34
  • hakunamatata34
Ima take a wild guess on what sounds right A
whpalmer4
  • whpalmer4
Did you read what I wrote in my last post (not counting the post with a link to another page)?!? You have 15,000 parts. With a normal distribution (which the problem says we have), 95% of them will be within 2 standard deviations of the 15.000 cm target. 95% will pass. If you cannot figure out how many will not pass from that information, you are not making any effort to do so. Read this paragraph over and over if necessary. By the way, you are not allowed to post test questions on OpenStudy. If you are going to cheat and do so anyhow, have the decency to not later mention that it is a test question so that the people who try to help you understand and solve the problem don't get punished for their efforts to salvage your education.

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