GrandMoffChris
  • GrandMoffChris
Select two sentences that best state a central idea in paragraphs 5–9 of the passage. Anne Lindbergh was a very private person, shying away from reporters. Anne Lindbergh was independent and always pursued her own interests. Anne Lindbergh was often asked to describe what it was like to pilot a plane. Amelia Earhart was jealous of the freedoms Anne Lindbergh had. Amelia Earhart was not able to tell reporters much about Anne Lindbergh’s private life.
Literature
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schrodinger
  • schrodinger
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GrandMoffChris
  • GrandMoffChris
1 Perhaps no woman flyer is more interesting than Anne Lindbergh. That is because of her own personality, the fame of her husband, and the way in which she has tackled flying. 2 Anne Lindbergh is an extremely gentle person, essentially modest, totally lacking mannerisms, pretenses, and superiorities. She is small, yet she has a charming dignity when surrounded by people. Most notable of her physical features are her large blue eyes which look out from long lashes, often with a quizzical gleam, directly and frankly at everyone—except perhaps news photographers! Her bobbed brown hair is combed back in a natural wave from a wide intelligent forehead. Her skin is fair and clear. About her mouth a smile always seems to lurk. 3 Her dress is simple, like her direct manners. As pilot or passenger, she shuns affectations. Ordinary street or sport clothes suffice, except when she plans to fly in an open wingspanpit where cold makes flying suits more comfortable. Then, her diminutive figure engulfed in ungainly togs, she looks like a tiny teddy bear beside her six-foot-something husband. 4 Mrs. Lindbergh, who first soloed at the Aviation Country Club at Hicksville, Long Island, obtained her private license in 1931. 5 “What kind of individual is Mrs. Lindbergh, anyway?” a reporter asked me. “What does she do? What does she say? You know to the world she is a woman of mystery.”
GrandMoffChris
  • GrandMoffChris
6 Under the circumstances I could tell him nothing. But there are no secrets about her—just natural reticences. Mrs. Lindbergh is an unusual person but not mysterious. She does what she wishes. She reads, writes, and drives her own car. She slips out of the house when she pleases and goes where she pleases. I do not know what games, if any, she likes or what sports. 7 “Do you really like to fly?” 8 “What actually are the sensations of flying?” 9 Those two questions are most often asked Mrs. Lindbergh—mostly by other women. That second query, of course, is asked of all who are associated with aviation in any capacity. As to the first, I think it will surprise many to know that even before she met Colonel Lindbergh, Anne Morrow was enough interested in flying to have decided she would herself learn to handle an airplane sometime. 10 Mrs. Lindbergh once said substantially this to me in California. She was quiet, sincere, simply making a statement to another woman who, like herself, travels mostly by air. In speaking of her own flying, she was careful to make her attitude clear. It was not to be her business, but she felt that any woman who took it up professionally could find in it the greatest interest and enjoyment.
GrandMoffChris
  • GrandMoffChris
11 She went on to outline what one might call “the philosophy, of flying” of one who is undoubtedly today America’s best-known woman—flyer and flyee combined. It is simply this, that aviation is one of the most progress-bringing occupations today. It is a new kind of transportation, and as such, is an important part of living. It does not lie so close to humanity’s primal needs as food-getting or shelter requirements, but it means a great deal in satisfaction and comfort and in the distribution of much that is desirable. 12 I first met Mrs. Lindbergh at the opening of the forty-eight-hour coast-to-coast service inaugurated by Transcontinental Air Transport when I was one of the passengers on the first-west-bound plane. Colonel Lindbergh brought the first one eastward from Los Angeles, and in Arizona changed to one I was on, piloting it to the coast. With him was Mrs. Lindbergh. Later we met again, as we found ourselves houseguests in the same hospitable Los Angeles home. I think our hosts were no more surprised to have flying guests appear from Long Island than from Long Beach twenty miles away. For aviation has shrunk the continent to less than 12 hours of speed flying, or 36 hours by regular commercial planes.

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GrandMoffChris
  • GrandMoffChris
@semper :D
anonymous
  • anonymous
The second and last one.
GrandMoffChris
  • GrandMoffChris
thx
anonymous
  • anonymous
hey not to be rude or mean but you should close this question

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