anonymous
  • anonymous
How does the medium of Interview with Marielle Tsukamoto affect the structure of the main ideas and supporting sentences?
English
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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SOLVED
At vero eos et accusamus et iusto odio dignissimos ducimus qui blanditiis praesentium voluptatum deleniti atque corrupti quos dolores et quas molestias excepturi sint occaecati cupiditate non provident, similique sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollitia animi, id est laborum et dolorum fuga. Et harum quidem rerum facilis est et expedita distinctio. Nam libero tempore, cum soluta nobis est eligendi optio cumque nihil impedit quo minus id quod maxime placeat facere possimus, omnis voluptas assumenda est, omnis dolor repellendus. Itaque earum rerum hic tenetur a sapiente delectus, ut aut reiciendis voluptatibus maiores alias consequatur aut perferendis doloribus asperiores repellat.
chestercat
  • chestercat
I got my questions answered at brainly.com in under 10 minutes. Go to brainly.com now for free help!
gabbyalicorn
  • gabbyalicorn
Is there a passage to read?
anonymous
  • anonymous
we don't know what the medium is, paste the interview here
gabbyalicorn
  • gabbyalicorn
I'm about to take my break, btw...I'll be coming back though.

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anonymous
  • anonymous
Question: How long did your family spend in an internment camp? Answer: We were sent from Florin, California, to a temporary facility at the Fresno County fairgrounds for 6 months beginning in May of 1942. From there our family along with others from California were sent to Jerome, Akansas. We were never at Topaz. The US government set up 10 internment camps in various locations in the United States. These camps were located in desolate, unpopulated places throughout the continental states. The government did not want the people of the United States to know much about the internment of 120,000 Americans of Japanese ancestry. Question: What is one thing you would like everyone to know about Japanese American internment.? Answer: First, I would want everyone to know that all of us, the American citizens born in this country as well as our grandparents and parents who originally came from Japan were innocent of any wrong. We were loyal Americans. The FBI and military investigated all persons of Japanese ancestry and found we were loyal Americans. There was no single incident of any hint of treason or wrong. Question: What was a typical day like for you in the camps? Answer: A typical day in an internment camp such as Jerome would begin with families getting up. Remember we did not have any water in our rooms. We just had one light bulb and a small stove. We had to get dressed and go to the middle of the block to use the toilet, wash up and take showers. Usually there were people waiting in lines. After you brushed your teeth and cleaned up, you had to go to a separate building for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. They had two sessions. If you were late or forgot your ticket, you could not eat. We stood in line for the food, which was served on metal trays, and we sat at long wooden tables with benches. There really wasn't much to do the rest of the time. My dad ran the recreation center for our block. Mother organized and coordinated YWCA (Young Women's Christian Association) and USO activities. The USO was organized to welcome Nisei soldiers who were visiting their families. At night we would stay in our room. We didn't have TV in those days. And we did not have a radio. Question: What do you remember about having to leave your home in Florin, California? Answer: We lived on a small farm in Florin, California. My father raised grapes and strawberries. I had a small Australian shepherd named Uppie. I remember going into our garden and seeing my grandmother crying on the day we left. I told her not to worry; she would come back and her beautiful garden would still be there. Family friends drove us to the railway station in Elk Grove. I was not allowed to take my dog. He died before we returned. My dads' good friend, Bob Fletcher, took care of our farm, so we had a farm to return to. This was not true for most of the other families that lived near us. Elk Grove Train Station Question: What were the saddest memories you remember? Answer: I think the saddest memory is the day we had to leave our farm. I know my mother and father were worried. They did not know what would happen to us. We had no idea where we would be sent. People were all crying and many families were upset. Some believed we would not be treated well, and maybe killed. There were many disturbing rumors. Everyone was easily upset and there were many arguments. It was a horrible experience for all of us, the old people like my grandparents, my parents and children like me. We were all innocent. The government had no real reason to send us into these camps. There were racists who did not want the Japanese to own land and begin to prosper. Racism, prejudice, greed, and lack of political leadership caused the evacuation and internment. Jerome Internment Camp (Arkansas) Question: What were some of the happy moments you remember? Answer: I remember getting some Christmas presents in Jerome. My grandmother made me a pair of mittens. Most of the presents we received were made from things people found in camp. My dad made a cute woodpecker to put by our door so I would know which room was our home. All of the barracks and doors looked alike. I was only four and could not read the letters and numbers on the buildings, so I would get lost sometimes after using the bathroom. Question: What would you like us to know about your mother? Answer: I want people to know that she was a great teacher who loved her family and her country. She had the courage to speak out and do something about the injustice. She worked hard to pass redress. When a group of people feel they have been treated unfairly by the government, the US Constitution guarantees you the right to redress the government. The Japanese Americans did that and because the Civil Liberties Act of 1988 was passed by Congress, our constitution is strong again. It was weakened by Executive Order 9066 when President Roosevelt ordered 120,000 innocent Japanese Americans into internment camps. Mary Tsukamoto always took the initiative to follow her beliefs. She was a respected author (she wrote the book, We the People, a Story of Internment in America), a political activist and someone who worked for world peace. She was selected by the California State Senate as a Notable Californian. Note: Marielle Tsukamoto is currently an educator and administrator in the Elk Grove School District, Elk Grove, California. The above electronic interview was conducted by 5th grade students at Barbara Comstock Morse Elementary School, who were fortunate to attend Ms. Tsukamoto's Time of Remembrance Program - and wanted to learn more about this important chapter in our nation's history. For further information regarding this project, contact Gail Desler, 5th grade teacher, BC Morse Elementary School.
gabbyalicorn
  • gabbyalicorn
Lol, everybody else left.
anonymous
  • anonymous
That's all you gabby, I have no clue what the answer is.
anonymous
  • anonymous
is the answer a written response or multiple choice?
anonymous
  • anonymous
multiple choice
gabbyalicorn
  • gabbyalicorn
Okay, I just read it. Where are the options, if it is multiple choice.
anonymous
  • anonymous
i got it now thank you
gabbyalicorn
  • gabbyalicorn
Oh, okay.
anonymous
  • anonymous
thanks for trying to help.

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